• Fill 'er Up. It's hard to improve on the bucket. A time-tested means of conveyance, it remains the most sensible, effective means to transport most liquids and many solids. With water collection such a central part of daily life in Outreach-affiliated communities, buckets are on every list.
  • Student Bodies.'Most kids giddily splash around in mud puddles and engage in contests to determine by taste who among them has the dirtiest hands. We can't blame them for their enthusiasm, but we can educate them on the steps they can take to wash up for their own well-being. There's nothing wrong with a lot of good, clean fun, either.
  • A salad with only one ingredient isn't a 'salad,' it's an 'ingredient.' Provide a variety of seeds for our partners' gardens, and you'll provide an agricultural buffer against potential pests, inhospitable weather, and a greater earning income at market after harvest time. Around the table, you'll ensure that families' diets are more varied and nutritious, and that every meal is as filling as it is fulfilling.
  • Look, there on the ground! It's a basin! It's a dispenser! It's a—jar? Sure, why not? Whatever you call it, the function and benefits are the same for our partners: A trustworthy, in-home, refillable means of storing and dispensing clean water that keeps contaminants out while saving time and effort. Plus, it sort of looks like a nose, which is fun.
  • Lavaplatos Sinks, Hope Floats. Lavaplatos, the Spanish word for "dishwasher," provides the most basic, effective means of draining excess water used for bathing, laundry and food preparation away from homes. The basin's strikingly sensible design, ease of installation, and hygienic efficacy definitely make it a life-changer, if not a life-saver. Recipients share a portion of the cost for each basin, which has been modified from its original design to better suit our communities.
  • Spread Generosity, Not Germs. Bad news: Poor hygiene is one of the most persistent, ruinous issues facing those in impoverished communities. Good news: Hand-washing stations are a simple, social way to promote hygienic habits, so the only thing going viral is the news of how to stay healthy.
  • Thanks to the innovative determination of a number of women in Outreach-affiliated communities, addressing basic healthcare needs no longer demands a long trip to a distant clinic and a stack of unexpected expenses. Visiting mobile clinics are an affordable, convenient, professional way for women of all ages to get well, stay safe, and feel great. From screenings to checkups to all the treatments in between, visiting nurses and doctors ensure that patients avoid preventable issues, lead longer, healthier lives, and are treated as equals, not numbers.
  • Have a Rice Day. A bag of rice can be the only thing that separates a family from an empty pantry during seasonal stretches between harvests. Help minimize the worry, stress, and negative health effects of chronic hunger, keep our partners healthy, and allow for the simple pleasure of families gathering to share a meal each day.
  • Do Good. Do Well. Life without clean water is shorter and more stressful. The addition of a water well in a community is as life-changing as it is lifesaving. It returns trust to simple acts such as drinking, cooking, and bathing, eliminating the specter of water-borne disease lurking in every drop. Without a well nearby, community members spend hours each day walking long distances, waiting in long lines, carrying heavy containers, and boiling every drop, instead of working to earn a living or focusing on addressing other needs present in their lives. Add a well, and watch the rising tide lift all boats' more time every day to earn income, do household chores, raise families, and relax at the end of it all with a well-earned glass of refreshment.
  • Garden of Eatin'. A vegetable garden is a great introduction to the concept of sustainability. And after investing the time and effort to plant, nurture, and harvest everything, it's also a great way to make eating your veggies feel like hoisting a trophy and tasting victory.
  • Water sources vary between communities and climates, but many of our partners' access points are distant wells or basins fed by snow-capped hills and mountains above, which can pick up detritus on its way downhill. A filter provides more protection against harmful contaminants, and another way to keep everyone healthy for the empowerment ahead.
  • No, not a "care package" for animals, mailing a batch of cookies to beasts of burden from back home—an "animal care" package, for people! This year, provide a suite of vaccines, wellness clinics and thorough instruction for new animal owners to help them best care for their animals. If the animals are well-behaved, they might get some cookies, but we're not promising anything.
  • Plates and forks and stoves, oh my! Parents prepare hot meals on smokeless stoves, kids avoid the respiratory and vision issues associated with exposure to smoke, and everyone gets a place at the table to enjoy one another's company. Dig in!
  • Waste no more. A dignified, private place to use the restroom offers more than mere relief; it's also a hygienic refuge from catching or spreading serious diseases. Take a seat, make a splash, and feel the flush!
  • Student Bodies. Most kids giddily splash around in mud puddles and engage in contests to determine by taste who among them has the dirtiest hands. We can't blame them for their enthusiasm, but we can educate them on the steps they can take to wash up for their own well-being. There's nothing wrong with a lot of good, clean fun, either.
  • Reading, Writing, Regular Meals.Passing notes, watching the clock, doodling in margins' school has enough distractions. Hunger shouldn't be another one. Provide students with three nutritious meals daily, and give them the energy they need to succeed in their studies and get the most out of every recess.
  • Do Good. Do Well. Life without clean water is shorter and more stressful. The addition of a water well in a community is as life-changing as it is lifesaving. It returns trust to simple acts such as drinking, cooking, and bathing, eliminating the specter of waterborne disease lurking in every drop. Without a well nearby, community members spend hours each day walking long distances, waiting in long lines, carrying heavy containers, and boiling every drop, instead of working to earn a living or focusing on addressing other needs present in their lives. Add a well, and watch the rising tide lift all boats' more time every day to earn income, do household chores, raise families, and relax at the end of it all with a well-earned glass of refreshment.